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Posts tagged Terry Pratchett

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neil-gaiman:

nothingbutthedreams:

I just rediscovered how glorious this image is so excuse me while I laugh uncontrollably every time I look at it again.

It was taken in Kensal Green Cemetery in February.
Terry borrowed the white jacket from our editor, Malcolm Edwards, and grumbled that it did nothing to keep him warm on a very cold day.
“Sometimes you have to be cold to look cool,” I told him.
“It’s all right for you,” he said. “You’re wearing a leather jacket.”
“You could wear a leather jacket too.”
“I’m wearing white,” said Terry, pointedly. “That way, when they come after us for writing a blasphemous book, they’ll know I’m the nice one.”
(After the photo was taken we noticed the bat-winged hourglass, which we hadn’t seen during the photo session, and requested bat-winged hourglasses as a design motif in the book.)

Two of our favorites, looking awfully sharp on the back cover of Good Omens…

neil-gaiman:

nothingbutthedreams:

I just rediscovered how glorious this image is so excuse me while I laugh uncontrollably every time I look at it again.

It was taken in Kensal Green Cemetery in February.

Terry borrowed the white jacket from our editor, Malcolm Edwards, and grumbled that it did nothing to keep him warm on a very cold day.

“Sometimes you have to be cold to look cool,” I told him.

“It’s all right for you,” he said. “You’re wearing a leather jacket.”

“You could wear a leather jacket too.”

“I’m wearing white,” said Terry, pointedly. “That way, when they come after us for writing a blasphemous book, they’ll know I’m the nice one.”

(After the photo was taken we noticed the bat-winged hourglass, which we hadn’t seen during the photo session, and requested bat-winged hourglasses as a design motif in the book.)

Two of our favorites, looking awfully sharp on the back cover of Good Omens…

Filed under Neil Gaiman Terry Pratchett Good Omens

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Honoring Terry Pratchett

The great Sir Terry Pratchett turned 64 on Saturday, and if you haven’t read him, you might be wondering which book of his to start with. Fortunately for you, we can help.

The Discworld Graphic Novels

Imagine a flat world sitting on the backs of four elephants who hurtle through space balanced on a giant turtle. The Discworld is a place (and a time) strikingly parallel to our own—but also very different. But also very similar.

To commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the birth of the Discworld, the first two volumes of the remarkable Terry Pratchett’s equally remarkable—and phenomenally successful—series were made available together, right here, in graphic novel form. These beautifully illustrated renditions of The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic show and tell the bizarre misadventures of the spectacularly inept wizard Rincewind and Twoflower, Discworld’s very first—and possibly, portentously, its very last—tourist. Not to mention the Luggage, which has a mind of its own. And teeth.

The Wee Free Men: The Beginning

When Tiffany Aching sets out to become a witch, she faces ominous foes and gains unexpected allies. As she confronts the Queen of Fairies and battles an ancient, bodiless evil, she is aided (and most ably abetted) by the six-inch-high, fightin’, stealin’, drinkin’ Wee Free Men!

Laugh-out-loud humor and breathtaking action combine in the books that launched the unforgettable adventures of a determined young witch and her tiny but fierce blue friends.

Wintersmith

When the Spirit of Winter takes a fancy to Tiffany Aching, he wants her to stay in his gleaming, frozen world. Forever. It will take the young witch’s skill and cunning, as well as help from the legendary Granny Weatherwax and the irrepressible Wee Free Men, to survive until Spring. Because if Tiffany doesn’t make it to Spring—

—Spring won’t come.

Read more by Terry Pratchett

Filed under terry pratchett discworld